Things Are Changing In China

Strange as it may sound, there are some things I miss from the olden days of Communism in China -- where once you are connected to the right people you'd get things done. Where small gifts or just your friendship is worth something. Where some people are quietly proud of what they do and continue to do a good job regardless of there being no reward for doing a good job. The rest of the folks are told to do their job a certain way and they do it that way with a lack of motivation -- but just to pass the time. You know what to expect back in those good old days. 

Now, everyone is free to do whatever they want and are now able to own many things that are not even in the thinking formula back then (like cell phone and color TVs to say a few. Who doesn't have them now?) The new-found riches cause prices to jump unreasonably and, in fact, if it’s not expensive, it ain’t worth buying.

The quality, in general, is less than in the days of Communism because demand is so great and everyone is free to sell and try to confuse their clients instead of just telling it like it is as before. In the olden days, a standard actually meant something. For example, K101 is a specific standard for Tie Guan Yin. There were specific requirements in order for the tea to be called that. Those numbers mean less now and, instead of one enterprise being allow to produce it, everyone is doing it with their own standard. It’s a mess if you asked me . . . 


1 comment:

Tony said...

Hi Roy, I hear you, things sure can get muddled, but it's what happens in the free market. It's why people are able to make millions of dollars by misleading their customers with health benefits and such. There will always be us folks that don't fit underneath the bell curve, that question things and that see past marketed garbage.

In your post you mentioned K101 - is that monitored at all? Where can I find more information on that? Are there any other well-documented standards for Chinese teas?